Staff governors

Thewodros Leka

Allied Health Professionals, Scientific and Technical

What do you do?
I qualified with a Bachelor of Pharmacy as well as a postgraduate certificate in medicines management, a postgraduate diploma in clinical pharmacy, an MBA and a certificate in established leadership. I am also registered with the General Pharmaceutical Council of Great Britain.

I have more than 25 years' experience in pharmaceutical services and management. Recently, I worked in a senior management role as principal pharmacist in the patient services and pharmacy dispensary at West Middlesex University Hospital, a lead directorate pharmacist for Surgery at our Chelsea site and currently as a lead directorate pharmacist for Surgery, Dermatology, Neurology, ITU, Clinical Imaging and Theatres at West Mid.

My management experience and achievement is supported with some of real examples such as:

  • Inspiring shared purpose where I have introduced improved pharmacy service and patient care by introducing a surgical satellite pharmacy and winning the 2018 service improvement award at the Trust
  • Evaluating information to generate new ideas and make effective plans for improvement. This is evidenced by using audit data to influence the Trust management to finance the establishment of the surgical satellite pharmacy 
  • Connecting our services where the pharmacy team work with social services team, specialist diabetes nurses, pain and anaesthetics team to improve patient safety and transfer of service
  • Engaging others where the pharmacy team is involved in the provision of training for nurses and doctors, recording of clinical interventions, auditing to reduce medication errors and improving patient safety

I work closely with other healthcare professionals in the Trust on both sites on multidisciplinary projects to develop and implement various clinical guidelines and protocols such as management of diabetic surgical patients, prescription pattern of opioid drugs in elective surgical patients, participating in innovative research and clinical trials.

Why did you become a governor?
Patient safety and service improvement is my prime motivator, though I am passionate about all aspects of pharmacy and derive great pleasure from developing my understanding and skills. It is my ambition to search for ways to improve patient safety in general and medication safety in particular here and around the world. 

Being a governor will be a good opportunity to share my experience to improve the service we provide. 

Nicole Nunes

Contracted

Biography to follow. 

Catherine Sands 

Management

What do you do?

I am Head of EPRR and Business Continuity - my role is to ensure that the Trust fulfils the Civil Contingencies Act (2004), which requires NHS organisations to demonstrate they can plan for, and respond to, a wide range of incidents and emergencies that could affect health or patient care. This programme of work is referred to as emergency preparedness, resilience and response (EPRR). I have the honour of working with staff of all specialisms and grades across all sites, whether delivering training sessions or live exercises with our multi agency colleagues, to ensure our plans are robust. 

I have worked for the NHS since 1987 starting as a Nursery Nurse before qualifying as a Registered General Nurse and a Registered Sick Children’s Nurse. I joined the Trust in 2001 as a Paediatric Senior Sister in the ED, initially seconded as Project Lead to revise the Major Incident Plan, extended in response to the 2009 Swine Flu, role became substantiated when demand for the role increased e.g. to support the planning for the installation of power generators at Chelsea site, role never has a dull moment…

Why did you become a Governor?

I am in a privileged position to be able to work with other Governors and management to ensure the Trust continues to put patients first by providing a positive experience both in the hospital and with our wider community, whilst striving to be the best in the country. Combined with my enthusiasm for the Trust, I believe I can add value to the board bringing a different perspective to help support the Trust’s future strategy in today’s evolving healthcare. The role is both fulfilling and empowering with a positive sense of achievement. 

bio mark nelsonProf Mark Nelson

Medical and Dental

What do you do?
I am a consultant physician at the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital and Professor of HIV Medicine at Imperial College. I trained at Jesus College, Cambridge and Westminster Hospital medical school from where I qualified in 1986. I worked at the old Westminster and St Stephens hospital until I  was appointed Consultant Physician at this hospital in 1991. I am also the senior tutor at Imperial College School of Medicine where I provide the pastoral care to students in year 1 and 2. I have a large clinical practice with a special interest in HIV in patient care, co-infection with hepatitis B and C and the clinical utility of new antiretroviral agents. I am the newly appointed chair of IAPAC(International Association of Providers of AIDS care) which represents over 25,000 providers of HIV care globally and am the London representative for fast track cities which aims to achieve (and indeed has done) 90 percent of those with HIV diagnosed, 90 percent on treatment of which 90 percent is successful. I have published over 600 peer reviewed papers on HIV and hepatitis. In my spare time I was a keen sportsman particularly football and cricket but now spend more of my time on the more restive, but more competitive, duplicate bridge circuit.

Jacquei Scott

Nursing and Midwifery

What do you do?
I initially came to West Middlesex University Hospital in 2001, when I began my career as a Macmillan Cancer & Palliative Care Clinical Nurse Specialist. I left in 2004 to gain more experience and confidence in my role, returning in 2012.  I took up the added role of End of Life Care Facilitator in August 2017, targeting the education of the staff, therefore leading to improving the care of patient’s in the last phase of their life, their families and carers. During the total of nine years working at West Middlesex, I feel it’s fair to say, I know and am known by a lot of people in the hospital. I became the carer of my mother in 2007 after she was widowed, and automatically went from being solely a member of staff to also being the Next of Kin and carer of a patient who regularly visited the hospital as an out-patient and in-patient. She died in West Middlesex Hospital just before Christmas 2016, and I can’t thank the staff enough for the care and respect they gave her during the many admissions.

Why did you become a governor?
I am very proud of our hospital and the Trust and would like to use this opportunity to give back to the Trust, using my experiences as a nurse and as a carer to continue being an advocate to our patients and their families, and a voice for my nursing and midwifery colleagues, ensuring the Trust continues to provide the highest quality patient care. It is an honour, and an exciting opportunity for me to represent staff views in the continued shaping of this Trust’s future. It is important that staff feel their opinion is acknowledged and valued in major decisions taken by the Trust, as they are the greatest resource within the NHS.

Vacant

Support, Administrative and Clerical

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