Public governors

Julie Carter

Ealing

My family have been treated and well cared for at Chelsea and Westminster over the past 25 years. I would now like to give back to the hospital in my role as Public Governor.

I have a background in both law and education, and have served on the board of a large state school during its most challenging times and aim to listen to the residents of Ealing and represent you fully.

rose-levy-apr-2021.jpgRose Levy

Hammersmith and Fulham

What do you do?

I am retired now, from having been a teacher to civil service work. I now mainly do voluntary work to keep myself not just active but I also care about our community. I was working in Citizens advice for 5 years and now for the past 2 years I have been working with SSAFA, which is a Veteran's charity. 

Why did you become a Governor?

I used to live in Newcastle and was a governor in the Freeman Hospital Trust, for about 3 years, prior to moving to London, where I have been now for 10 years. As soon as I came here I got involved in both the Imperial trust and the Chelsea and Westminster Foundation Trust, partly - because I am a patient in both - but also I am passionate about our NHS. I even went to University, for a second time, and studied Nursing but unfortunately had to drop out after 3 semesters as I had other issues in my private life.

Trusha Yardley

Hammersmith and Fulham

What do you do?
I am first and foremost a mother of three girls, living in the Fulham area. I am a qualified accountant and work at Credit Suisse where I am Chief Operating Officer within the risk department. I am also Treasurer of All Saints Church, Fulham.

Why did you become a governor? 
I became a Governor as I would like to use my skills and experience to support and help Chelsea and Westminster Hospital to prosper and continue in its outstanding provision of NHS health services in an area I live in and love. And why this hospital? For me personally, its where I and my whole family have received emergency and maternity care throughout the years, for which I am always grateful and in awe of its people, facilities, services and care provided. I want to help to ensure this continues to be available to everyone and help to improve and develop further.

Parvinder Singh Garcha

Hounslow

I consider myself to be blessed to be commencing my 42nd year in the NHS. The 'S' in the NHS is of prime importance to me, as I am committed to service. I am passionate about bringing about improvement in healthcare for everyone, by better engagement, partnership, and collaboration between patients, healthcare staff, ancillary staff and managers.

I have lived locally in Hounslow since 1988; I have been a GP in Hounslow for over 30 years, and feel that I know the local area well. I have also been able to serve our community in various roles as a charity trustee, school governor, and board member of CCG. My family and I have been patients at West Middlesex at one time or another.

Laura-Wareing-Apr-2022.jpgLaura Wareing

Hounslow

What do you do?
I am a full time mum with a background in criminal law, publishing, editorship, journalism and healthcare consultancy. Over the years I have been involved with Macmillan Cancer Support, Dignity In Dying, Age Concern, Howard League For Penal Reform, Advocacy in mental health, Kensington and Chelsea's PPIF—all of these in communications, public relations and public information roles. Be it educating through the written or spoken word, helping others has always been a big part of me.

Why did you become a governor?
I have a deep passion for patient care both personally and professionally. I want to be able to support changes enabling better quality healthcare that addresses the needs of all patients and a changing population. I had my daughter in Chelsea and Westminster Hospital and have lived in the Borough of Hounslow for most of my life—both are therefore extremely special to me.

bio Richard BallerandRichard Ballerand

Kensington and Chelsea

What do you do?
I am an Axolotl partner with a background in finance and defence, and significant advisory and board experience in the public, private and charity sectors. My current health policy portfolio includes lay roles with: NICE (National Institue for Health and Care Excellence)NIHR (National Institute for Health and Care Research)HDR UK (Health Data Research)RSM (Royal Society of Medicine), and EIT Health (European Institute for Innovation and Technology). I also hold a number of fellowships, and serve on a range of advisory boards. All this tends to keep me busy, but I find it fulfilling.

Why did you become a governor?
I wanted to put my enthusiasm, knowledge, and experience of international healthcare to good use in this excellent (and improving) flagship Trust. After having travelled the world in various capacities, I have lived for most of my life in the Royal Borough, and wanted to pay forward into a system that is facing difficult times ahead. I have a special interest in those with invisible disabilities and deficits, in the challenges facing the ex-military, and in community members with a non-standard background.

Dr Paul Kitchener

Kensington and Chelsea

What do you do?
I'm retired from a career in clinical medicine, research and healthcare management. I now seem to have too many interests including an advocacy charity, Jungian psychology (with an associated committee) and a cottage with too much land near Oxford.

Why did you become a governor?
I want to continue using my long and varied experience of medicine and its management, and the voluntary sector, especially in such a flourishing organisation. 

Stuart Fleming

Wandsworth

I was governor of Sussex University Trust from 2012–21, rated outstanding by the CQC. I am very much “hands on” as a governor, I have volunteered at hospitals during the pandemic and busy times, and take the time to get patients opinions. I was active on committees, disabled rights and LGBT+, striving for equality. Having ran my own business, it has grown through hard work, vision and re-investment. I am well placed to be a strong contact for the members and public.

My experience encompasses working for Mencap where I facilitated a campaign called “Treat me Right”, raising awareness of learning disabled patients in the NHS. Following this campaign, hospitals have been mandated to appoint a lead nurse for these patients. I have been a Registered Manager with CQC 2006–09 for The Queen Elizabeth Foundation. I am skilled, taking an overview and working from budget ensuring that the business is as efficient as possible allowing maximum re-investment, benefiting patients and staff. I am keen to promote information technology’s positive benefits within the NHS.

Now London based, I have enjoyed meeting many other passionate foundation members, patients and staff. I truly believe that I have much to offer and would be delighted to work with the Trust. Most importantly, I am a positive person, I always take an interest in individuals, their opinions and their experience of the service matters. I will hear and act on the patients voice always!

Caroline Boulliat Moulle

Wandsworth

What do you do?

As a local resident for more than 15 years and a Mum of four children, I know the Chelsea and Westminster hospital well. My family and I have experienced its excellent professional medical care, including during the joy of giving birth.

Why did you become a governor?

Being a governor is a great opportunity to give something back to the hospital for everything from which my family and I have been so lucky to benefit. I am a pharmacist and I come from a family with a deep interest in improving people’s health. My father and grandfather are both doctors in Medicine. I have a deep passion for patient care. I believe my professional background, combined with my personal experience as a patient, a daughter and a mother, could contribute and help the Trust deliver and execute successful long term plans, helping medical professionals to deliver the best clinical care for patients within the financial budget. Being a Governor will be a privilege. It is a great opportunity to be involved, to support and influence the strategic objectives for a Trust in which I so passionately believe, with a strong focus on patient needs.

Cass J Cass-HorneC-J-Cass-Horne.jpg

Westminster

What do you do?
As a Senior NHS Health Advisor, I have personal experience and knowledge of NHS services. I was elected previously as a Patient Governor at the Trust from 2009–12. During that time I played an active role in driving up standards of care and increasing the membership of both sites when the two trusts joined. I became a Governor because of my first-hand experience of care received at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital as a patient. I bring a unique perspective to the NHS as a patient having worked in numerous health services abroad. During this, I experienced how hospitals can tailor their services better for the communities they serve. My combined experience in HR, non-executive advisory roles and NHS Health Advisory will be invaluable as a Public Governor. I believe members of the public and patients visiting the NHS should be treated equally, fairly and with respect. Viewpoints of the public and patients are very important and help Governors making informed decisions. In my previous role as a Patient Governor I worked with commitment and dedication to represent patients. 

Why did you become a governor?
As a Public Governor, I pledge I will represent Westminster residents' opinions with the same enthusiasm. I will contribute and ensure that all persons are able to access services at our Trust. I am a strong believer in the NHS.

Anthony Levy

Westminster

What do you do?

I combine business Board roles with business school teaching and leadership consulting and coaching. For over thirty years I have run this alongside giving much of my time to voluntary and community organisations. This has included the NHS, where I have held Chairman, non executive and Governor roles, and a variety of charities mainly in health and social care. I am currently the Chairman of Self-Management UK which helps people with long term conditions to live healthier and happier lives (and reduces their demands on the NHS).

Why did you become a governor?

With a long term commitment to the NHS, I have always been keen to contribute to the process of continuous improvement. I am particularly interested in quality and access issues, and representing the public in ensuring that our hospitals deliver for patients and carers whilst being supportive to staff and delivering value for public money.

Feedback

Was this page useful to you?

Share this page